Vaccinations

Vaccination is the key to protecting your dog or cat against diseases. Visit our Wellness Clinic or your veterinarian regularly to keep your dog’s or cat’s vaccinations up-to-date and for routine physical examinations that can help detect potential health problems early. These preventative measures will help ensure the best quality of life for your canine or feline companion – your friend for life!

Dogs

Dog are wonderful companions. It’s no wonder we consider them our best friend. Their love for us is unconditional, and we regard them as true-blue members of our families. The least we can do is give them the care they need and deserve.

Rabies
Rabies is a viral disease that can affect all warm-blooded mammals, including dogs, cats, wildlife and humans. The virus infects cells of the nervous system, producing incoordination and behavioral abnormalities such as unusual aggression or withdrawal. Once the signs of rabies appear, the disease is always fatal. Rabies is usually transmitted by bite wounds, often from infected wildlife, which represent the largest reservoir of the disease in the United States. Vaccines are very effective in preventing rabies. Most states in the U.S. require rabies vaccination of dogs at one- to three-year intervals. Most states also require rabies vaccination of cats.

Canine distemper
Canine distemper is a widespread virus that causes high mortality in dogs. Exposure is considered inevitable during a dog’s lifetime, so canine distemper vaccination is almost always recommended. Puppies and young dogs without immunity are at greatest risks. Canine distemper virus infects various tissues in the dog’s body, producing diarrhea, fever, nasal and ocular discharge, respiratory disease, appetite loss and neurologic signs such as muscular spasms and paralysis. The disease is easily transmitted and often fatal.

Infectious canine hepatitis
Infectious canine hepatitis (ICH), caused by canine adenovirus type 1 (CAV-1), is a worldwide disease of dogs. CAV-1 infects a wide range of tissues, including the liver (hence the name hepatitis), kidneys, spleen and lungs. Infected dogs typically develop a fever and abnormal bleeding, and experience loss of white blood cells, which are a key component of the immune system. Opacity of the eye (“blue eye”) occurs in some cases. Death, chronic hepatitis or severe illness may occur, and recovery may be gradual in nonfatal cases. CAV-1 is shed in urine and can survive outside the host for weeks or months.

Enteritis (Diarrhea, Vomiting)
Dogs are at risk of enteritis (intestinal disease) caused by two common viruses, canine parvovirus and canine coronavirus. Canine parvovirus enteritis is generally considered to be more severe than coronavirus enteritis. However, parvovirus enteritis may be more serious if coronavirus is also present. Diarrhea and vomiting caused by these viruses can range from mild to severe and are accompanied by depression and loss of appetite . Unvaccinated puppies and young dogs are most commonly affected because they usually have not been previously exposed or vaccinated and are susceptible to infection. Viral enteritis is easily spread because of the large volume of virus in feces, which contaminates the environment and is readily spread from one animal to another. Severe cases of viral enteritis can be fatal due to dehydration and loss of appetite. Puppies are at greatest risk of death because of their limited body reserves.

Canine respiratory disease
Infectious respiratory disease is a troublesome problem in dogs because it is easily transmitted through the air or by direct contact, especially in kennels or among dogs living together. Upper respiratory disease can limit the dog’s activity and progress to pneumonia, Which can be life-threatening. The most common causes of respiratory infections in dogs include canine adenovirus type 2 (CAV-2), canine parainfluenza virus and Bordetella bronchi­septica bacteria. CAV-2 is closely related to CAV-1, the cause of infectious canine hepatitis (ICH). For this reason, CAV-2 vaccines provide dual protection against both ICH and respiratory disease caused by CAV-2. Infectious tracheobronchitis , or ITB (“kennel cough” or “canine cough”), is a persistent respiratory disease with a harsh, dry cough, often caused by viral infection complicated by Bordetella bronchiseptica, the most common bacteria isolate found in dogs with ITB. There is a new injectable vaccine available that eliminates the need to give a sometimes-unpleasant intranasal vaccine.

Cats

Cats are wonderful companions. They give us joy, affection, and unconditional love. It’s no wonder we regard them as special members of our families. The least we can do is give them the care they need and deserve.

Rabies
Rabies is a viral disease that can affect all warm-blooded mammals, including dogs, cats, wildlife and humans. The virus infects cells of the nervous system, producing incoordination and behavioral abnormalities such as unusual aggression or withdrawal. Once the signs of rabies appear, the disease is always fatal. Rabies is usually transmitted by bite wounds, often from infected wildlife, which represent the largest reservoir of the disease in the United States. Vaccines are very effective in preventing rabies. Most states in the U.S. require rabies vaccination of cats. Most states also require rabies vaccination of dogs at one-to-three-year intervals.

Feline panleukopenia 
Also known as feline distemper, feline panleukopenia is a highly contagious, often fatal disease of cats. The disease is caused by a parvovirus transmitted by contact with infected cats, their feces, or environmental contamination. The virus is highly resistant and capable of surviving in the environment for months. Kittens without prior vaccination or exposure are most susceptible. Signs of acute infection include fever, anorexia, vomiting, diarrhea, dehydration and abdominal pain.

Feline respiratory disease
The great majority of feline respiratory diseases result from two easily transmitted infections, feline viral rhinotracheitis (FVR), caused by a herpesvirus, and feline calicivirus (FCV), pronounced (kah-LEE-see virus). FVR and FCV infections result in similar illnesses, charac­terized by nasal and ocular discharge, conjunctivitis, ulcers of the oral cavity, anorexia, depression and inflammation of the upper respiratory tract. Cats usually recover in one to two weeks, although cats with FVR can become persistently infected after returning to normal, shedding the virus during periods of stress. FVR can result in abortion of infected fetuses. Kittens are at greatest risk of FVR and FCV because they usually have had no prior vaccination or exposure and are highly susceptible to infection. Chlamydia psittaci (klah-MID-ee-ah SIT-ah-kye) bacteria are a less common cause of feline respiratory disease but can increase the severity of FVR or FCV infections. Vaccines are available for FVR, FCV and Chlamydia psittaci.

Feline leukemia
Feline leukemia is a high-mortality disease caused by the feline leukemia virus (FeLV). FeLV produces immunosuppression, which can then lead to other diseases or infections such as respiratory or gastro­intestinal disease. Cats that survive these initial diseases may develop some form of cancer, hence the name feline leukemia. The disease is transmitted by direct contact with infected cats or with contaminated food dishes or litter boxes. Feline leukemia vaccination is now commonplace.